Read the Kanji on this page with POPjisyo.com      






  XML RSS feed
  XML RSS feed
  XML RSS feed
  XML RSS feed
  XML RSS feed
 


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License

 
<< eru | evaluation-group >>

(essential)
    Meaning: Grammar you must know
    JLPT Level: 0
    Category: lesson
    Author: TaeKim

  [ Edit This Grammar Entry ]

  Notes:  
Sorry...no Notes exist yet for this entry...
[ Add Note(s) ]
  Tutorial:  

Grammar you must know

We have learned the basic foundation of the Japanese language. Now that we have a general knowledge of how Japanese works, we can now extend that by learning specific grammar for various situations. This section will go over what is considered to be essential grammar for basic practical Japanese. You will begin to see fewer literal translations in order to emphasize the new grammar now that you (should) have a good understanding of the basic fundamental grammar. For example, in sentences where the subject has not been specified, I might simply specify the subject in the translation as 'he' even though it may very well be "we" or "them" depending on the context.
This section starts with transforming what we have learned so far into a more unassuming and politer form. In any language, there are ways to word things differently to express a feeling of deference or politeness. Even English has differences such as saying, "May I..." vs "Can I...". You may speak one way to your professor and another way to your friends. However, Japanese is different in that not only does the type of vocabulary change, the grammatical structure for every sentence changes as well. There is a distinct and clear line differentiating polite and casual types of speech. On the one hand, the rules clearly tell you how to structure your sentences for different social contexts. On the other hand, every sentence you speak must be conjugated to the proper level of politeness. In section 3, we will cover the polite version of Japanese, which is required for speaking to people of higher social position or to people you are unfamiliar with.

This section will then continue to cover the most useful major types of grammar in Japanese. For this reason, we will learn the most common conjugations such as the te-form, potential, conditional, and volitional. The latter sections are in no particular order and neither does it need to be. The grammar that is presented here is essential which means that you have to learn it all anyway and learn them well.
Lessons covered in this section
    conjugation for the polite form. Also covers the various types of pronouns and their appropriate uses. marker in other contexts. Comp sci majors, you'll want to read this section! you don't have to do something. Japan! using quoted subordinate clauses.

Copyright © 2003-2006 Tae Kim (kimchi314@yahoo.co.jp)
Report a correction or suggestion for this page
  Examples:  
Note: visit WWWJDIC to lookup any unknown words found in the example(s)...
Alternatively, view this page on Rikai.com

Sorry...no examples exist yet for this entry.

Help JGram by picking and editing examples!!
  See Also:  
    [ Add a See Also ]
      Comments:  
    Sorry...no Comments exist yet for this entry...

    Add Comment

    Due to some problems with spam comments, we have had to make the Add Comment feature available to members only. Please login or register.


    Add Entry to Your Study List
    Choose the priority of studying you want to assign to this item from the drop-down select list and then hit the save button. This will be used for sorting your personal study list. If you wish to delete an entry that's already in your list, just set the difficulty to '0'